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hi, I state that I've never used psychedelics, I'm here because I have a friend who says he has hppd after a bad trip, what are your symptoms? I also have After-images, objects that leave trails, visual snow (especially in poorly lit areas) if I look for more than 10 seconds one thing I see it moving and breathing (even the text I'm writing now, if I pay attention I can see it move) if I look at square surfaces I can see static lights that create geometric shapes (even as a child I could lol) if I notice I have a ton of floaters, with all this I want to say that these "bugs" we have them all, only that we ignore them because they are not important for our conscience. the friend who claims to have hppd to me seems more that has a kind of ptsd that is activated when you notice these visual "bugs", then I noticed that even if I focus so much on the visual snow for example I will start to notice it more until you can not ignore it until something does not distract my attention, if we obsess about a little thing the brain will end up growing it until it becomes a problem, I could even be wrong but this friend has solved quite a bit 'of visual problems simply ignoring them, when he saw them he looked away and did not think about it, in this way the brain has activated again that filter that serves to remove the visual noise, the important thing is to make the brain understand that that information is not important to you. sorry if I wrote badly but I used google translator, thanks for reading
Edited by Floreal
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Actually there is a little bit more to it then that, science wise, in those who suffer from HPPD. Although you are not wrong in the sense that many people will have perceptual disturbances if they look at an object for long enough, this is just a neurological blip in the way that the biological brain works.

 

One mechanism of action as to why perceptual disturbances are far more pronounced in those who have HPPD for example, is a proposed destruction of inter neuron GABA functioning. GABA is a key neurotransmitter that 'inhibits' and in turn would be a tremendous aid in our ability to tune out information that's not relevant to us. With people who have HPPD, they literally cannot tune out that information due to this destruction of interneuronal GABA functioning.

This is why benzodiazepines for example, which cause an increase in the functionality of the GABA neuroreceptor, help people with HPPD. It doesn't stop the visual disturbances, but it certainly makes it 100x easier to ignore the fact that they are there and allows us to naturally cope with them or tune them out, which goes to support the GABA destruction hypothesis. Now you also have to remember that this is only one mechanism of action, of which there are several in people who have HPPD - otherwise an increase in GABA functioning to account for interneuronal GABA destruction would pose a complete loss of all visual disturbances, at least for the period of time that the person is on a benzodiazepine, which it does not, unfortunately do.

So, it goes on, there is far more science wise that is going on.

 

What you are trying to say, perhaps, is that all people naturally have the biological framework for which HPPD can base itself around. This is obvious. We are all human, we are all biological creatures, and there are natural disturbances in perception based off of the fact that there are mechanisms of action which cause our biological selves to function in the way that we do. :)

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13 hours ago, jbalsa2 said:

Actually there is a little bit more to it then that, science wise, in those who suffer from HPPD. Although you are not wrong in the sense that many people will have perceptual disturbances if they look at an object for long enough, this is just a neurological blip in the way that the biological brain works.

 

One mechanism of action as to why perceptual disturbances are far more pronounced in those who have HPPD for example, is a proposed destruction of inter neuron GABA functioning. GABA is a key neurotransmitter that 'inhibits' and in turn would be a tremendous aid in our ability to tune out information that's not relevant to us. With people who have HPPD, they literally cannot tune out that information due to this destruction of interneuronal GABA functioning.

This is why benzodiazepines for example, which cause an increase in the functionality of the GABA neuroreceptor, help people with HPPD. It doesn't stop the visual disturbances, but it certainly makes it 100x easier to ignore the fact that they are there and allows us to naturally cope with them or tune them out, which goes to support the GABA destruction hypothesis. Now you also have to remember that this is only one mechanism of action, of which there are several in people who have HPPD - otherwise an increase in GABA functioning to account for interneuronal GABA destruction would pose a complete loss of all visual disturbances, at least for the period of time that the person is on a benzodiazepine, which it does not, unfortunately do.

So, it goes on, there is far more science wise that is going on.

 

What you are trying to say, perhaps, is that all people naturally have the biological framework for which HPPD can base itself around. This is obvious. We are all human, we are all biological creatures, and there are natural disturbances in perception based off of the fact that there are mechanisms of action which cause our biological selves to function in the way that we do. :)

or the basic problem of hppd is anxiety and benzodiazepines simply reduce it giving you the ability to ignore those visual bugs. Anxiety can give rise to obsessions, in my opinion if a person who claims to have hppd make him lose the memory of the day he took psychedelics even the disorder would disappear

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1) I absolutely agree that HPPD is a violation of the GABA (GABA)

(My HPPD was injured after abrupt cancellation of pregabalin (lirika)

2) I absolutely agree that HPPD can be ignored and after a while we stop noticing it.

I had HPPD 5 years. I got married, started working and I had a baby. I generally forgot about hppd and lived a normal life. I was constantly tormented by anxiety, DR / DP. And I did not notice the visuals, although they were, I no longer afraid of them. Again, I noticed them after the abolition of pregabalin and strong mental stress. And I got into HPPD hell again  But Lamotrigine (Lamictal) helped me.

 

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6 hours ago, Vladchik22 said:

1) I absolutely agree that HPPD is a violation of the GABA (GABA)

(My HPPD was injured after abrupt cancellation of pregabalin (lirika)

2) I absolutely agree that HPPD can be ignored and after a while we stop noticing it.

I had HPPD 5 years. I got married, started working and I had a baby. I generally forgot about hppd and lived a normal life. I was constantly tormented by anxiety, DR / DP. And I did not notice the visuals, although they were, I no longer afraid of them. Again, I noticed them after the abolition of pregabalin and strong mental stress. And I got into HPPD hell again  But Lamotrigine (Lamictal) helped me.

 

what are your visual symptoms?

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