MadDoc

Don't forget to be kind

6 posts in this topic

I've seen some threads on this forum decompose into insults and shouting matches.  We all have opinions, perspectives, experiences, and information we've obtained from various sources.  If someone posts something you don't agree with, pisses you off,  or seems like misinformation, please reply in a constructive and courteous manner.  Before you post, think about what you might say if you were talking to the person face to face, and don't forget to be kind.  We're all struggling with a difficult disorder.  Remember, we all have the goal of being well.  Let's help each other get there.

Thank you.

Edited by MadDoc
More foolish typing
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Very good post. We need to pull in the same direction and help each other. Polite counter points are fine, but why does it have to quickly resort to swearing and anger? 

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