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    • By Bursting Aura
      Some research I found on anti-depressants efficacy and comparisons with placebo. Worth a read.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4172306/ 
       From Harvard
      Antidepressants and the Placebo Effect
      Even the small statistical difference between antidepressants and placebos may be an enhanced placebo effect, due to the fact that most patients and doctors in clinical trials successfully break blind. The serotonin theory is as close as any theory in the history of science to having been proved wrong. Instead of curing depression, popular antidepressants may induce a biological vulnerability making people more likely to become depressed in the future.

      The most commonly prescribed antidepressants are SSRIs, drugs that are supposed to selectively target the neurotransmitter serotonin. But there is another antidepressant that has a very different mode of action. It is called tianeptine, and it has been approved for prescription as an antidepressant by the French drug regulatory agency. Tianeptine is an SSRE, a selective serotonin reuptake enhancer. Instead of increasing the amount of serotonin in the brain, it is supposed to decrease it. If the theory that depression is caused by a deficiency of serotonin were correct, we would expect to make depression worse. But it doesn’t. In clinical trials comparing the effects of tianeptine to those of SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants, 63% of patients show significant improvement (defined as a 50% reduction in symptoms), the same response rate that is found for SSRIs, NDRIs, and tricyclics, in this type of trial (Wagstaff, Ormrod, & Spencer, 2001). It simply does not matter what is in the medication – it might increase serotonin, decrease it, or have no effect on serotonin at all. The effect on depression is the same.
      What do you call pills, the effects of which are independent of their chemical composition? I call them “placebos.”
       
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4592645/ 
      From Duke and Brown University
      Antidepressants versus placebo in major depression: an overview
      As of now, antidepressant clinical trials have an effect size of 0.30, which, although similar to the effects of treatments for many other chronic illnesses, such as hypertension, asthma and diabetes, is less than impressive.
       
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22147715 
      Comparative benefits and harms of second-generation antidepressants for treating major depressive disorder: an updated meta-analysis.
      Meta-analyses and mixed-treatment comparisons of response to treatment and weighted mean differences were conducted on specific scales to rate depression. On the basis of 234 studies, no clinically relevant differences in efficacy or effectiveness were detected for the treatment of acute, continuation, and maintenance phases of MDD. 
       
       
    • By Bursting Aura
      Omega 3's are mentioned a lot for there importance for brain health. Vitamin D can also pass the blood-brain barrier, so it should be investigated for mental health also. I drove over some papers on vitamin D and depression since yesterday, so I will share some of those here. Depression impacts quality of life and it is usually implicated to be self-caused. According to science, depression can be biological, therefore depression is not always a lack of spiritual perspective or a case of "bad" vibes. My conclusion from these papers is that most cases of depression are very situational. Vitamin D deficiencies are not rare, and can potentially have a healing affect with some cases, similar to anti-depressants. The optimal ways to get vitamin D in my opinion, is sunshine and mushrooms. I would stay away from raw mushrooms due to carcinogens reported in the literature. heat destroys them though. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2132000
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3751336/
      Efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in depression in adults: a systematic review protocol
      "The efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in depression has raised lots of concern. Vitamin D is considered as a neurosteroid [56], and now it is attested that vitamin D metabolites can cross the blood–brain barrier [34]. Because of the widespread presence of vitamin D receptor in areas of the brain including the hippocampus which is associated with the development of depression [23], it could be speculated that there is a clinical effect of vitamin D on depression."
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26680471
      Vitamin D in anxiety and affective disorders.
      "Reduced levels of vitamin or its metabolites have been reported in various psychiatric disorders. Insufficient levels of vitamin D in depressive patients have been confirmed by many authors. Significantly lower levels of calcidiol (vitamin D) were found in men and women with depression as well as in age matched patients with anxiety disorders.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25713056
      Vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids control serotonin synthesis and action, part 2: relevance for ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior.
      "Serotonin regulates a wide variety of brain functions and behaviors. Here, we synthesize previous findings that serotonin regulates executive function, sensory gating, and social behavior and that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior all share in common defects in these functions. It has remained unclear why supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D improve cognitive function and behavior in these brain disorder"
    • By justaman
      I took hppd about 2 months ago and ever since I’ve been very aware of what I’m seeing. Like at night when I’m in the car driving, I’m not sure if it’s been there before but street lights or any sort of light kinda has a glare to it, like very shiny and has like a glow to it. I’ve noticed that when I look at the moon. There’s another moon next to it but half of the size, like a glare. I suck at explaining but am I getting hppd or is all this normal? I’ve been stressing over This for a while now and I’m going to a psychologist to get checked out. 
       
      I forgot to mention that I only taken lsd once. I’ve only smoked weed before . 
    • By HDDeer
      Hey guys,
      My doctor prescribed me lamictal yesterday and as pretty much all of you know, it's one of the more highly regarded medication out there for this condition.
      My hppd is actually very bearable, the only time I struggle is when I'm alone in the house where the lsd trip happened, which leads me to a few questions.
      If I decide to take it, and my hppd gets better/worse/stays the same, if I stop taking it will I return to baseline? Has anyone else taken this med? 
David S. Kozin

HPPD Article that I will discuss in Video.

1 post in this topic

Here is the article that appeared as a book chapter. I am sharing it for the purpose of academic and general research for the benefit of the human condition.

I do not want to give away the details that I will present, but I will be giving a critical analysis of it, which can have good and bad points. My video review will be part of the series of videos I will provide that will cost a nominal fee per viewing (for the first 6 months or so, and then it can be open to everyone.) However, it takes a lot of work to create, read, pay for the articles, student loans and put together the content so I have to stop feeling guilty for asking for money. This one is free, but as  I discussed on the Facebook HPPD and DP/DR group, I will be returning to research and providing research reviews on my youtube channel, opportunities for individuals to learn research methods as a lay person or for work to design and receive funding for their own or co-designed research.

If you have issues with the article, good, bad, in between you are encouraged to try and work through reading a research article and make notes either publicly or for yourself.

I will go through it from a unique perspective. Even the general emotion it gives you.

You get to be the judges.

- David Kozin

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      THE LINK IS BELOW: A copy will also be placed in the section for documents also.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences pp 1-28 (2).pdf

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