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Could do with some reassurance

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Just want to start by saying to whoever has fixed the site...thank you! its great to finally be able to sign up. 

Been suffering with mild-moderate (at its worse) HPPD + moderate - strong DP/DR for around 14 months now. After around 5/6 months, I was starting to feel comfortable with my symptoms and ended up having a pint of beer. Well for whatever reason it fucked me up and my symptoms went hellish for about 3 months. After that I got back on track and had been doing okay for a while. 

This passed weekend I had a friend over and I smoked a few cigs (i smoke very occasionally with no issues) with him whilst he was outside smoking a joint. The next night after I had a really bad nights sleep and felt like I was tripping. Since then (5 days ago) I've felt like I've slipped back into a bad state again and whilst most of my visual symptoms havent got any worse, I feel like lines wobble when I look at them (like they did the first few months), my DP has flared up along with anxiety, and I have this weird feeling of dizziness that I had in the first few months. Like when Im sat still I can physically feel myself swaying sometimes. 

Anyway, are random flare ups normal? Im currently in my final few weeks of writing my dissertation so is it just stress? I know it sounds stupid but is possible I got some second hand smoke from his joint (I didnt feel high, and we were outside)??. i've been through this once and it took me around 2-3 months to get back on track, so Im trying to stay positive, however I cant help but worry Im going to be stuck in this worse state. I just cant seem to place why it would just get worse like this after months of being generally okay. Its just so annoying when 5 days ago I actually had a generally dp/hppd minimal day.

Anyone who has experienced similar, or just some reassurance would be appreciated.



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There have been more than a few users who've had their symptoms worsen due to second-hand weed fumes so that's definitely a possibility. It sounds like you could just be hyper sensitive to substances. I'm the same way and have had many small flare ups throughout this process but I always go back to baseline relatively soon. Sleep could definitely be a problem, and overworking your brain. Have you tried any stress-relieving practices? Meditation or massage? You should also closely examine if you've changed anything in your diet over the last few months. In my experience, because I'm so sensitive, even the slightest alterations in what I eat can make a huge difference in my mood and perception. A few nights ago I ate a potato right before bed and woke up at 2 a.m. with extreme anxiety because of carb overload. 

No matter the case, as long as you really keep an eye on what you're eating, how much you're sleeping and your general level of stress you should be OK. 


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