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Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder (HPPD) Support Forum

Onemorestep

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  1. I too have had feeling of being “cured” by valerian. What I did not know is that valerian is just a benzodiazepine drug that occurs in nature. Keep us updated on how you’re faring! Would love to see this as a success story
  2. Ambien is in a class of non-benzodiazepine drugs colloquially know as “z-drugs”. It works through positive allosteric modulation of gaba-a receptors just as benzodiazepines do. Remember, just because something cannot technically be called a benzodiazepine drug due to its structure, does not mean it isn’t, for all intents and purposes, a benzodiazepine drug. Ambien comes with all the same nasty withdrawal effects that normal benzodiazepines do. And, like many benzodiazepines, it will drastically increase the likelyhood you will experience some form of dementia later in life if taken for an extended period of time into old age. Hell, even if started in old age it will do this. Seniors who start any benzodiazepine drug have a 50% high chance of developing dementia within 3 years of starting the drug. So that’s how ambien is really just a benzo... and here’s how it’s waaaaay different from one: 1) ambien is one of e few benzodiazepine-like drugs that can cause hppd. Due to this, I would be incredibly careful with this drug. It is possible it will not trigger this in you the first time you take it, or the second, the 30th time, or at all. But, like hppd, you don’t always get the trigger on the first try. 2) Ambien has also been known to bring some people in semi vegetative states back to consciousness while they are on the drug. Why this happens? Who knows. But it certainly doesn’t happen with Ativan or clonazepam. Im certainly happy that you have found relief from a condition that has been ailing you. I too have had issues with insomnia and it can be very aggravating. I do recommend that people try more natural remedies to their insomnia before chemical ones. The brain is particularly good at instigating tolerance in the face of chemical sleep aids. It is inevitable and something I have seen with ambien frequently. It is not fun to have to take ambien or you won’t sleep for days until you do. if you are looking for ways to improve your sleep quality, these are the most important things I have found: 1) buy a blue light box for seasonal depression and use it year round. They are available on Amazon for very cheap. They are also lightweight, small, and portable. You need a box that creates 10,000 lux. If you use it for at least an hour before 11 am, you will receive an “melatonin dump” from your pineal gland in the evening of that day. It’s going to make you feel quite tired and you will want to sleep. The more you do this, the more reliable this effect becomes. Humans were meant to be outside in the mornings, and we rely on the angle of the sun hitting the atmosphere to produce blue light for our circadian rhythms.... but only in the morning. This is why people say screens are so bad for your sleep. It tells your brain it’s morning and to not release melatonin. 2) only use your bed for sleeping. If you can, only use your ROOM for sleeping. Do not watch television in bed. Create a habit where the second you get into bed, your brain knows it’s time to sleep. 3) try to fall asleep by 10pm. Your brain receives its deepest sleep between the hours of 10pm and 2am. This sleep can not be made up by extra hours at different times. 10 hours of sleep between 10pm and 8 am is infinitely superior to 10 hours form 2 am to 12pm. There are plenty more things that can help you sleep better that will not harm you! These are the three most important things for me though. hope this helps oms
  3. Definitely do not want to overdue it! I find if I do a dose of 20,000 every week or so I’m fine. Or max 5,000 a day. I may be able to/need to take more though because I have a VDR mutation. I mainly posted this because I, like many Americans, do not get enough sunlight. I started to exhibit some pretty intense D deficiency symptoms very rapidly a few weeks ago. Extreme depression, anxiety, lethargy, orthostatic hypertension, shortness of breath you name it. 20,000 units of D later I felt like a human again. I do get bit by seasonal depression every winter no matter what. It’s never gotten this bad before though.... might have something to do with the 300,000mcg of methyl b12 I took one day
  4. Thought I should share this here: reduction in autoimmune disease via testosterone. There is some thought that HPPD could be immune related in some way. " In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4+ T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1–stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells." https://www.jimmunol.org/content/186/9/5162
  5. Thought I should share this here: reduction in autoimmune disease via testosterone " In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4+ T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1–stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells." https://www.jimmunol.org/content/186/9/5162
  6. Just a reminder to take your vitamin D! Almost have the population is deficient in the US and it’s hard to be happy without remember you need D + K2 at the same time for absorption and to make sure the calcium in your body goes into your bones and not your arteries. I use metagenics brand but there are plenty of others I’m sure are fine. https://www.amazon.com/Metagenics-D3-5000-120-Count/dp/B002D64I98 “Berridge conducted a study in 2017 which have evidenced that depression caused by an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the brain. Hypothesis argues that vitamin D reduces the increase in neuronal levels of calcium (CA +2) that are driving depression. Vitamin D plays a role in maintaining the expression of the CA 2+ pumps and buffers that reduce CA 2+ levels, which may explain how it acts to reduce the onset of depression [21]. In 2014, Gezen-AK et al. conducted a study which shows that vitamin D regulates the release of nerve growth factor (NGF), an essential molecule for the neuronal survival of hippocampal neurons as well as cortical neurons [22]. Di Somma et al., in a study, shows optimal levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream are necessary to preserve the neurological development and protect the adult brain [27]. Balanced dietary intake is a well-established lifestyle factor in maintaining cognition during ageing. A recent study shows that vitamin D helps in keeping cognitive function in older adults [28]. An interesting study conducted by Harrison et al. shows the association of vitamin D deficiency and the development of diabetes mellitus through paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. It shows the positive relationships between them [29]. In November 2017, Kesby JP et al. conducted a study showing the effect of vitamin D on both widespread neurotransmitter changes (glutamine/noradrenaline) and regionally selective neurotransmitter changes (dopamine/serotonin). It concluded that developmental vitamin D deficiency leads to these brain changes [30-31]. Due to its effect on dopamine pathway in the brain, vitamin D can be a useful therapeutic agent used as an intervention therapy to be combined with existing treatments for Parkinson’s disease [32]. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a superantigen and can initiate inflammation. Microglial cells in brain fight against these types of inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency affects the inflammatory process in the brain causing exposure of the brain to these vulnerable pathogens” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6132681/
  7. https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpheart.00683.2017 ”Minoxidil improves vascular compliance, restores cerebral blood flow, and alters extracellular matrix gene expression in a model of chronic vascular stiffness” interesting at the least. I’ve been helped by drugs that increase blood flow to the brain before. I used to take low dose coal is daily just because it made me feel better.
  8. I have taken Gaba before and noticed a slight effect--but I have a very permeable Blood Brain Barrier due to a slew of TBI's. There are gaba receptors in the body, but tbh i didnt notice much. It may increase growth hormone though. For normal people, Gaba is unable to enter the brain because it cannot pass through the protective barrier that separates the brain from the body. Thank god for that... else msg would kill you. Gaba would make you overdose. It would be very bad. The reason we develop drugs such as clonazepam is because they can get to the brain and increase gaba functioning. There are thousands of molecules that can work at receptor sites but only a few can get into the brain in the first place.
  9. "Furthermore, LEV restored the Glu/GABA ratio to approximately the control level and significantly increased the GABA concentration after the initiation of high-K+ conditions. Based on these data, LEV treatment restored the lost balance between the excitatory and inhibitory systems under basal conditions. Moreover, LEV showed a selective effect by preferentially increasing vesicular release of GABA, a mechanism by which LEV could reduce epileptic seizures." https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29331845 This isn't the first time i've come across data that shows Keppra is able to restore homeostasis to brain systems. I'm still searching for the other article I read about restoration of other systems besides inhibitory/excitatory balance. Since many people here appear to be in some sort of pre-epileptic state, this may be good to show your doctor if you are trying to get a prescription for keppra.
  10. I have read that taking b6 can help with the Keppra rage. I had a bit of it myself on keppra and regular old b6 basically made it go away.
  11. Good to hear it’s working out. You should look into antioxidants for the 6 hydroxydopamine metabolite. This is what causes the damage from amps. running cycles of bpc-157 while taking breaks from the amphetamines should help with any weird DAWS effects. memantine should help prevent tolerance. Can have side effects tho but not for all.
  12. The main issue I see with this is the effect doesn’t seem to be any different from taking a non gaba Maoi and adding gabapentin, which also works through inhibiting gabaT. Unfortunately, gabapentin comes with a slew of side effects for some and a pretty nasty withdrawal. From personal experience, I can say I never want to withdraw from it again. The relief it provides pretty much stopped after 8 months and it took me about a year to get off of it 😕 this was longer than I think most patients, but I was already working with a very screwed up gaba system from hppd and benzo withdrawal. This was a drug I looked into though and it is cool in my mind from a pharmacological aspect if it can be used short term or cycled it would be pretty sweet I think
  13. I can now handle some caffeine after about 6 years of healing and it is pleasurable/not anxiety inducing. If I smoke marijuana, this threshold decreases over time until it is no longer pleasurable and just causes anxiety. Being able to handle a small amount of things that I couldn’t at the onset of hppd took a LONG TIME OF ABSTINENCE. Your brain needs time to heal. Diego is correct that the general consensus is that it is bad. If you overdo it early on it can put you back several steps in healing.
  14. dopamine deficits are commonly seen in patients with hppd and may be an underlying influence in the symptomatology of the disorder. I have had extensive correspondence with a member of this website who has experimented with the pde7 inhibitor S14, which induce dopaminergic neurogenisis and reduces inflammation, to great success. I was wondering if anyone else here has tried this too? It isn’t exactly the easiest drug to acquire unfortunately. I do, however, have the source for synth that they used and am considering trying some. I had great benefit from bpc-157 on my dopamine system and believe that s14 could push that healing farther. I used a lot of amphetamines throughout my childhood an adult life as treatment for adhd. I noticed, after taking 2 years off them when I was 17 and then returning to them for 2 years, that I felt very different. Less able to get pleasure or motivation from the things pre amphetamine. This never really went away. Bpc helped, but I’d like to see if it can’t improve more. I’ve taken a big break from trying new things the last year and a half so I’m not sure I’m ready to jump in yet, but I am interested in people’s thoughts and opinions. below is a link about s14 cheers, oms https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312578151_Targeting_PDE7_by_the_small_molecule_S14_a_potential_disease-modifying_Parkinson's_disease_therapy_ready_to_start_clinical_trials and links about PDE7 inhibition: References/studies regarding PDE7 Targeting PDE7 by the small molecule S14: a potential disease-modifying Parkinson's disease therapy ready to start clinical trials https://www.research...clinical_trials PDE7 inhibitors as new drugs for neurological and inflammatory disorders https://www.research...atory_disorders Amyloid β-induced impairments on mitochondrial dynamics, hippocampal neurogenesis, and memory are restored by phosphodiesterase 7 inhibition https://alzres.biome...3195-018-0352-4 Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Induces Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in Hemiparkinsonian Rats https://www.ncbi.nlm...les/PMC4449102/ Omeros Elucidates Mechanism of its PDE7 Inhibitors in Addiction https://www.prnewswi...-198935981.html Dual inhibitor of PDE7 and GSK-3-VP1.15 acts as antipsychotic and cognitive enhancer in C57BL/6J mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm...pubmed/22749842
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