Cupasoup

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About Cupasoup

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  1. Thanks alot for your input guys! I will try melatonin (time released) and valerian, which both seem to improve slow wave sleep, in addition to the magnesium I already take each night. If it is necessary I might add supplementary GABA to this stack. I'll keep you updated!
  2. Hi all, Allthough I sleep for 8-9 hours almost every night, I look and feel quite tired every single day. Also, since a few months i have been suffering from a cold, you know: running nose, coughing, sore throat, which does not seem to disappear. As you might know, the performance of the immune system is closely related to the amount of quality sleep a person gets, and I think this is the reason for my chronic cold. This has made me think that although the quantity of my sleep is fine, the quality of my sleep might be sub-optimal, possibly because of the disinhibition in my brain caused by HPPD. I use an iPhone app that determines sleep cycles by measuring nightly movement and it shows that I have a fairly normal sleep pattern. Furthermore, the fact that I remember my dreams ocasionally suggests that I am able to enter REM sleep (although perhaps this says nothing). Anyway, I'm hoping to increase my sleep quality to an extend that it will be more refreshing/restorative and perhaps increases my general well-being (physical and psychological). Probably, a better night of sleep might be beneficial to all of us. I'm interested in any of your experiences with supplements or medications that increases the quality of your sleep. Up untill now I often take magnesium before going to bed, I sleep in a very dark and quite room and even use a sleep mask now and then. Also, I don't have a hard time falling asleep and I usually do not wake up during the night. Its just that I do not feel (and look) very refreshed the next day. I have been searching around a bit myself and I stumbled upon some articles about Gabapentin (links below), that proposedly increases sleep quality. I know some of the members here have used or are using Gabapentin, can you share your experiences about that? I would not want to take it every night, to prevent the build-up of tolerance against it, but perhaps once or twice a week to just give me a better night of sleep on some days. What are your experiences with the build-up of tolerance? Any other ideas are welcome as well, thanks alot! Cupasoup Treatment effects of gabapentin for primary insomnia. (2012) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20124884 Gabapentin versus pregabalin in improving sleep quality and depression in hemodialysis patients with peripheral neuropathy: a randomized prospective crossover trial. (2013) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22644743
  3. Any update on this direction of treatment? Thanks :-)
  4. Got any update on the coluracetam odisa? And did you already obtain the CBD? Greetz!
  5. Odisa: can you relate to the effects that other users of coluracetam have reported? that were on the list you made a while back? Visual sharpness More vivid color perception Etc.? I agree with stateofregret (and yourself) that perhaps you should try to increase the dose for once, just to experience what the stuff is capable of doing to your symptoms and whether is it has any effects whatsoever Anyway, just my thoughts on this! P.S.: Sucks to hear about your bad day. They seem to be a returning part of HPPD life (actually also in life without HPPD), and they usually come and go. As of today i just try to take 'em for granted and try to realize that next time i probably will have a very good day again
  6. Very interesting! I strongly belief that visual training has the potential to reduce visual symptoms. Maybe you should consider taking some supplements/nootropics that promote neurogenesis? E.g. Ashwaganda, Lions Mane, alpha-GPC, creatine
  7. Interesting! Quite similar, indeed. Can anyone relate to this having used of Pro-cholinergic substances? Choline, Piracetam? I have used CDP-choline for a while, but got frequently struck with awfully depressive bouts, so i had to stop. I experienced no relieve in visual symptoms during use, and no noticable cognitive benifits whatsoever, but it could be me.
  8. Hi, I just stumbled upon a visual training software product, Revitalvision, that is scientifically proven to increase vision in patients with amblyopia or "lazy eye". In amblyopia, visual information from one (and sometimes, though rarely, both) eyes is not processed properly. Amblyopia is a developmental neurological condition of the brain, not a problem in the eyeball. On the products website is emphasized that revitalvision is training the brain to see better: "The program uses neural training to improve your vision. Just like learning to walk, riding a bicycle and learning to swim have long lasting effects, so does RevitalVision." The benefits of the visual training for patients with Amblyopia are mentioned on the products website: Increase contrast sensitivity - enhancing your ability to discern objects that blend into the background, like a menu in a dimly lit restaurant Increase visual acuity - improving your ability to see and distinguish fine details, which is measured with an eye chart Enhanced vision - while driving and reading Ability to see better - in low light conditions Reduce - halos, starbursts and glare while driving or seeing at night As it seems, a lot of these improvements relate to the visual symptoms we experience. Therefore, this might also be benificial for some of us, think about a reduction in VS, frame vision, night blindness, halos, starbursts, morphing, etc. I belief that the plasticity of our brain is sufficient to reduce visual symptoms of HPPD, if only you stimulate/train it in the right way. I think this is also why most HPPD sufferers experience a reduction in symptoms in the long term, the brain slowly adapts to HPPD. I know that the visual symptoms are not as bad as the asociated psychological symptoms some of us have. But maybe, if we can "fix" the visuals, the psychological symptoms will be fixed concurrently. This might be due to neurological changes, but also as a consequence of the improved vision as a result of this training. For example, i think Derealization is strongly related to our visuals symptoms, the world looking unreal because of them. And another one is anxiety, a lot of anxiety is caused by the visual symptoms that constantly remind us of having HPPD and feeling miserable. Possibly, if our visuals are reduced by actual neurological changes instead of using meds, these symptoms might fade as well. You'll have to contact your doctor to order the product, which might be difficult, since you have to persuade him to believe that this might work for you. But on the other hand, this product is completely safe and you can do the training at home on your own computer. I don't see any reasons for your doctor not to cooperate, except that the software might be somewhat expensive. Anyway, i thought this might be interesting for some of you. Just check out the website yourself! http://www.revitalvision.com/Amblyopia/ Cheers
  9. Hi guys, I quickly skimmed the article (i have access). The authors only proposed their method of outward attention being a psychological therapy based on several reports that a mode of inward attention has negative effects on ones state of mind. In other words, they did not actually test neither prove that an increase of outward attention could lead to relieve of psychological symptoms, so its just a theory. I agree however, that this approach would closely mimic meditation, like syntheso said. By silencing the mind, one can find inner peace. Have you ever heard about Eckhart Tolle? He is a spiritual guru and his method is all about letting go of inner thoughts and the continous rambling of the mind by looking around ('stop and smell the flowers'), focusing on the here and now and feeling alive. Grtz